Blast Back, Continuing to Explode

Awright! Finally! The next chapter of Blast Back is up for your reading pleasure. This one is a bit slower than the first, but I hope you enjoy it all the same.

Chapter II also gives us a bit more insight into the world of Blast Back, and I think it might behoove me to explain something that I’m not sure would ever get explained through normal dialogue (but who knows, maybe later?). For now, I’ll just let you guys in on the thought-process. In this chapter we hear some students tossing out odd words, insults specifically, at each other, here’s what they mean in the context of Blast Back‘s universe.

Breadcutter
A derogatory term for squires or really any blade-using warrior. Refers to the person being useful for nothing more than cutting a soft loaf of bread. Especially attributed to squires of the Luna Caeruleum Academy, who use training sabers with incredibly dull edges up until they are gifted a sharpened sword at graduation.

Dazzler
A derogatory term for acolytes studying the magical arts. Dazzling is an extremely basic low-level spell that emits simple sparks like fireworks from the hands. As it is such a low-level spell, it’s one of the simplest to learn, and so to call a mage a dazzler is to call them a simpleton. Fans of Dungeons & Dragons might know of a similar low-level spell.

Spoonsucker
Aristocrats are already often mentioned as having been born with a silver spoon in their mouths, and this insult takes it a step further, implying that the aristocrat not only has privilege, but wants and expects more, like trying to suck more soup from a spoon that can only give so much. In essence, a spoonsucker isn’t just an aristocrat, it’s one that demands more and more simply because of their privilege.

Hope you all enjoy the new chapter, and I hope you’re all interested in going deeper into this world with me. Till the next post, Keep Yourself Alive!

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About jbsargent

Writer. Artist. All around charming lad.

Posted on March 24, 2014, in What's New? and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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